Connect with us

Seeing Butterflies

Ava DuVernay, Gloria Carter and Samira Wiley Honored at GLAAD Awards Because Black Women Stay Winning

Black Women in Entertainment

Ava DuVernay, Gloria Carter and Samira Wiley Honored at GLAAD Awards Because Black Women Stay Winning

By Felice León via https://www.theroot.com

For Gloria Carter, a closeted gay black woman with four kids, life was not horrible. But it was “different.”

“I chose to protect my family from ignorance. I was happy, but I was not free,” said Carter at the 29th Annual GLAAD Media Awards in New York City.

 Carter is the mother of four children, including her youngest son, rapper Shawn “Jay-Z” Carter. On Saturday, Carter received the Special Recognition Award for her coming-out story on “Smile”—by now, you’ve likely heard the song on Jay-Z’s Grammy-nominated album, 4:44.

“‘Smile’ became a reality, because I shared with my son who I am. Not that people didn’t know. It was someone that they didn’t talk about but they loved me anyway.” Carter continued, “But to me, this was the first time that I spoke to anyone about who I really am.”

That evening Carter shared the stage with some phenomenal black women including Laverne Cox, Blair Imani and Root 100 honoree, Yamiche Alcindor. Truth be told, The Root was there to cheer on the black women. Sorry, not sorry. Among the sistren was Samira Wiley, who took home the

 

Read More: Ava DuVernay, Gloria Carter and Samira Wiley Honored at GLAAD Awards Because Black Women Stay Winning

Chrysalis

I am a future butterfly at the stage of growth when I am turning into an adult. I am enclosed in a hard case shell formed by love, family, and friends. It is the hardest stage of becoming a black butterfly. You will encounter many hardships only to come out stronger and better than what you went in. At this stage, you are finding out who you truly are and how to love yourself.

More in Black Women in Entertainment

What Does It Mean To Be “Black Butterfly Beautiful”

The image of the butterfly has come to define the many expressions of the feminine black consciousness and for a good reason. The butterfly is the perfect articulation of the exquisite beauty of nature. Whether tiny or large, brightly colored or more subdued, the butterfly’s allure is undeniable. Each one displays its own unique patterns and hues, and no one species outshines any other.

Similarly, there is no one ideal image of a black woman -- each is gorgeous in her right. All African-Americans share a glorious history of struggle and perseverance that has funneled into the modern black renaissance. And, like the graceful butterfly, the awakened black woman exemplifies the dazzling beauty of that cultural evolution.

Flying High

To Top