Connect with us

Seeing Butterflies

Dr. Rebecca Lee Crumpler: The first Black woman M.D. in the US

Black Women in History

Dr. Rebecca Lee Crumpler: The first Black woman M.D. in the US

By Written by Maria Cohut, Ph.D. via https://www.medicalnewstoday.com

Many Black women have contributed to the development of the medical sciences throughout history, though often, their names have remained little known. In this Special Feature, we celebrate the life and achievements of one of these Black pioneers: Dr. Rebecca Lee Crumpler.

Writing in a BMJ Opinion piece, Dr. Nycole K. Joseph, a neurologist-in-training, describes her experience of racism as a Black physician practicing in the United States.

“My Blackness entered the room first, and my other attributes followed,” she writes.

“Although a career in healthcare is rewarding, it poses particular engrained challenges for people from diverse ethnic backgrounds. Black professionals often cite experiencing isolation, lack of representation within departments and in leadership positions, as well as inadequate…

Read More: Dr. Rebecca Lee Crumpler: The first Black woman M.D. in the US

Continue Reading
You may also like...
Chrysalis

I am a future butterfly at the stage of growth when I am turning into an adult. I am enclosed in a hard case shell formed by love, family, and friends. It is the hardest stage of becoming a black butterfly. You will encounter many hardships only to come out stronger and better than what you went in. At this stage, you are finding out who you truly are and how to love yourself.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

More in Black Women in History

What Does It Mean To Be “Black Butterfly Beautiful”

The image of the butterfly has come to define the many expressions of the feminine black consciousness and for a good reason. The butterfly is the perfect articulation of the exquisite beauty of nature. Whether tiny or large, brightly colored or more subdued, the butterfly’s allure is undeniable. Each one displays its own unique patterns and hues, and no one species outshines any other.

Similarly, there is no one ideal image of a black woman -- each is gorgeous in her right. All African-Americans share a glorious history of struggle and perseverance that has funneled into the modern black renaissance. And, like the graceful butterfly, the awakened black woman exemplifies the dazzling beauty of that cultural evolution.

Flying High

To Top