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Girls Trip and Bronx Gothic: Two Visions of Post-Obama Black Empowerment

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Butterflies in Entertainment

Girls Trip and Bronx Gothic: Two Visions of Post-Obama Black Empowerment

Upward mobility, freedom, and fun — or grim self-loathing and complaint

Part of the mess that Barack Obama left in the wake of his two presidential terms is the utter confusion that has descended upon black Americans who still feel stressed despite the media-promoted privilege of witnessing “the first African-American president.” That delusion deserves a lengthy, in-depth essay, but a movie column must provide a portion of it through this week’s contrasting releases: Hollywood’s black feminist comedy Girls Trip and the independent art film Bronx Gothic. Black female self-confidence is examined in Girls Trip’s story of four black girlfriends who attend an Essence Festival (staged by the magazine of that name) in New Orleans. Bestselling author Regina Hall, Internet entrepreneur Queen Latifah, nurse and single mother Jada Pinkett, and tough-talking office worker Tiffany Haddish mix business and partying (they “trip”) as they clear away the conflicts and changes that separated them in their transition from youth to maturity.

Black female self-confidence is examined in Girls Trip’s story of four black girlfriends who attend an Essence Festival (staged by the magazine of that name) in New Orleans. Bestselling author Regina Hall, Internet entrepreneur Queen Latifah, nurse and single mother Jada Pinkett, and tough-talking office worker Tiffany Haddish mix business and partying (they “trip”) as they clear away the conflicts and changes that separated them in their transition from youth to maturity.

Bronx Gothic is more obviously political, translating the subject of black femininity into the now fashionable project known in academia as “the black body,” explored here …

Please read original article – Girls Trip and Bronx Gothic: Two Visions of Post-Obama Black Empowerment

Chrysalis

I am a future butterfly at the stage of growth when I am turning into an adult. I am enclosed in a hard case shell formed by love, family, and friends. It is the hardest stage of becoming a black butterfly. You will encounter many hardships only to come out stronger and better than what you went in. At this stage, you are finding out who you truly are and how to love yourself.

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What Does It Mean To Be “Black Butterfly Beautiful”

The image of the butterfly has come to define the many expressions of the feminine black consciousness and for a good reason. The butterfly is the perfect articulation of the exquisite beauty of nature. Whether tiny or large, brightly colored or more subdued, the butterfly’s allure is undeniable. Each one displays its own unique patterns and hues, and no one species outshines any other.

Similarly, there is no one ideal image of a black woman -- each is gorgeous in her right. All African-Americans share a glorious history of struggle and perseverance that has funneled into the modern black renaissance. And, like the graceful butterfly, the awakened black woman exemplifies the dazzling beauty of that cultural evolution.

Flying High

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