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‘Katrina Girl’ Inspired To Join The Military 12 Years After Sergeant Rescued Her

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‘Katrina Girl’ Inspired To Join The Military 12 Years After Sergeant Rescued Her

‘Katrina Girl’ Inspired To Join The Military 12 Years After Sergeant Rescued Her

The two formed a strong bond after reuniting.

 

In a rare joyous moment amid the pure dismay of Hurricane Katrina, an Air Force pararescuer saved a 3-year-old girl and her family from the floods in 2005. After the rescue, the little girl gave the man a huge hug that was captured in an iconic photo.

The moment left a lasting impact on both LaShay Brown and Master Sgt. Mike Maroney. The duo reunited a decade later and have kept in touch ever since. Maroney has visited LaShay, now 14, and her family in Mississippi, and they speak on the phone weekly, according to People. He even taught her how to swim.

LaShay said Maroney’s support has inspired her to join the military one day. She said she doesn’t know which branch yet, but Maroney supports her.

“I am proud of her no matter what she does and will support her in everything she does,” he told People. “I think she understands service and I believe that she will do great things no matter what she…

 

Please read original article- ‘Katrina Girl’ Inspired To Join The Military 12 Years After Sergeant Rescued Her

 

Chrysalis

I am a future butterfly at the stage of growth when I am turning into an adult. I am enclosed in a hard case shell formed by love, family, and friends. It is the hardest stage of becoming a black butterfly. You will encounter many hardships only to come out stronger and better than what you went in. At this stage, you are finding out who you truly are and how to love yourself.

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