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#SAYHERNAME: 10 BOOKS THAT CELEBRATE BLACK GIRLS AND WOMEN

Black Women in Education

#SAYHERNAME: 10 BOOKS THAT CELEBRATE BLACK GIRLS AND WOMEN

By Mikkaka Overstreet via https://bookriot.com/

If there were ever a time to read books that celebrate Black girls and women, we are living in it. For a long time, Black women have been shouldering hatred from all sides. In a speech given in Los Angeles in May of 1962, Malcolm X said that the most disrespected, unprotected, and neglected person in America is the Black woman.

Black girls are hypersexualized and perceived as older than their white counterparts. Our schools criminalize and more frequently suspend Black girls than any other gender or race. Adults see Black girls as difficult and disrespectful, resulting in treatment that denies them childhood.

Furthermore, this continues into adulthood, where the angry Black woman stereotype runs rampant. Black women receive disproportionately subpar healthcare. They are more vulnerable to abuse. Black women, especial trans women, are more frequent victims of assault and murder.

Undoubtedly, this disregard of Black women has been exemplified in the recent cases of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, and Breonna Taylor. Months after his death…

Read More: #SAYHERNAME: 10 BOOKS THAT CELEBRATE BLACK GIRLS AND WOMEN

Chrysalis

I am a future butterfly at the stage of growth when I am turning into an adult. I am enclosed in a hard case shell formed by love, family, and friends. It is the hardest stage of becoming a black butterfly. You will encounter many hardships only to come out stronger and better than what you went in. At this stage, you are finding out who you truly are and how to love yourself.

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What Does It Mean To Be “Black Butterfly Beautiful”

The image of the butterfly has come to define the many expressions of the feminine black consciousness and for a good reason. The butterfly is the perfect articulation of the exquisite beauty of nature. Whether tiny or large, brightly colored or more subdued, the butterfly’s allure is undeniable. Each one displays its own unique patterns and hues, and no one species outshines any other.

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