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The 10: These Black Women in Computer Science Are Changing the Face of Tech

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The 10: These Black Women in Computer Science Are Changing the Face of Tech

The 10: These Black Women in Computer Science Are Changing the Face of Tech

We’re always hearing about the lack of diversity in the technology industry, especially when it comes to black women. While their numbers may be small, black women are doing big things in the tech world.

From leading research and engineering at Google to directing robotics and autonomous vehicle programs at top-tier universities, a black woman’s work is at the helm.

In honor of Women’s History Month, The Root collaborated with Google’s CS Education in Media team to speak with 10 black women in computer science and engineering who have been spearheading teams at notable technology companies for the last several years. It’s time they got their moment in the spotlight.

1. Tsion Behailu

Photo illustration by Elena Scotti/The Root/GMG

Title: Software engineer at Google

Inside her work: Tsion Behailu works on the Android partner engineering team at Google. Prior to joining Google, she was an intern at Groupon, where she automated the collection of page-performance metrics for the SEO team, wrote clients for various external APIs (application programming interfaces) and pulled data for application deployment. She earned a Bachelor of Science in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley.

2. Khalia Braswell

Photo illustration by Elena Scotti/The Root/GMG

Title: Founder of INTech Foundation Inc.; user-experience engineer at Apple

Inside her work: Khalia Braswell is a user-experience engineer at Apple and also the founder of INTech Camp for Girls in North Carolina, whose mission is to inform and inspire girls to innovate in the technology industry. After earning her bachelor’s in computer science from North

From leading research and engineering at Google to directing robotics and autonomous vehicle programs at top-tier universities, a black woman’s work is at the helm.

In honor of Women’s History Month, The Root collaborated with Google’s CS Education in Media team to speak with 10 black women in computer science and engineering who have been spearheading teams at notable technology companies for the last several years. It’s time they got their moment in the spotlight.

1. Tsion Behailu

Photo illustration by Elena Scotti/The Root/GMG

Title: Software engineer at Google

Inside her work: Tsion Behailu works on the Android partner engineering team at Google. Prior to joining Google, she was an intern at Groupon, where she automated the collection of page-performance metrics for the SEO team, wrote clients for various external APIs (application programming interfaces) and pulled data for application deployment. She earned a Bachelor of Science in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley.

2. Khalia Braswell

Photo illustration by Elena Scotti/The Root/GMG

Title: Founder of INTech Foundation Inc.; user-experience engineer at Apple

Inside her work: Khalia Braswell is a user-experience engineer at Apple and also the founder of INTech Camp for Girls in North Carolina, whose mission is to inform and inspire girls to innovate in the technology industry. After earning her bachelor’s in computer science from North Carolina State University, she went on to a master’s program in human-computer interaction from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Follow her on Twitter.

3. Bernadette A. Carter

Photo illustration by Elena Scotti/The Root/GMG

Title: Senior software engineer at Google

Inside her work: Bernadette A. Carter works as a technical lead and manager at Google Plus and holds more than 25 patents. In addition to innovation, she has a passion for encouraging others to pursue STEM-related (science, technology, engineering and math) fields. To that end, she serves as a TV-script adviser as part of Google’s CS in Media…

Please read original article-The 10: These Black Women in Computer Science Are Changing the Face of Tech 

Chrysalis

I am a future butterfly at the stage of growth when I am turning into an adult. I am enclosed in a hard case shell formed by love, family, and friends. It is the hardest stage of becoming a black butterfly. You will encounter many hardships only to come out stronger and better than what you went in. At this stage, you are finding out who you truly are and how to love yourself.

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