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#HairInspo: How 3 Black Female Techies Are Hoping to Cater to All Your Black Hair Needs

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Beauty and Health

#HairInspo: How 3 Black Female Techies Are Hoping to Cater to All Your Black Hair Needs

If you’re on this website, I’m going to take it as a given that I don’t need to tell you about the relationship between black women and their hair. And I don’t mean in a political kind of way. I mean the sense of culture and community that surrounds how we groom our luscious locks, regardless of how we choose to treat or style them. That is whether they’re permed, natural, weaved, in dreadlocks or up in box braids.

 At any given point you can find a black woman commenting on another black woman’s hair.

“I love that style, where did you get your hair done?”

“Where did you buy that hair, girl?”

“What products do you use?”

“How do you get your locs so curly?”

“How many packs of hair did it take to get your braids like that?”

The conversations can be endless. There are countless YouTube channels, blogs, social media pages, etc., dedicated to helping black women find #HairInspo, showing them wash routines and styling techniques and reviewing hair products.

 But now there’s an app for that. Three black software engineers and entrepreneurs—Cassandra Sarfo, Esther Olatunde and Priscilla Hazel—have created Tress, an app they hope will become the one-stop shop for all your black hair needs, inspirations and appointments.

“We do this all the time: We see a hairstyle that we like. We stop people on the street just to ask them where they did their hair, how much it cost them, or ask them for their stylist’s number,” Hazel told The Root. “And my mom, she takes pictures of her TV screen and [messages] me and asks me where she can have it done. It’s a habit that we have that we do all the time.”

So the women put their heads together to come up with a solution for what they saw as an obvious demand, and the app Tress was born. The long-term goal is to make Tress a one-stop shop for all things hair, and for the platform to be a seamless integration between someone seeing a hairstyle and knowing all the…

 

Please read original article – #HairInspo: How 3 Black Female Techies Are Hoping to Cater to All Your Black Hair Needs

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I am a future butterfly at the stage of growth when I am turning into an adult. I am enclosed in a hard case shell formed by love, family, and friends. It is the hardest stage of becoming a black butterfly. You will encounter many hardships only to come out stronger and better than what you went in. At this stage, you are finding out who you truly are and how to love yourself.

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