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7 Books By Black British & Irish Women You Should Be Reading This Black History Month & Beyond

Black Women in Education

7 Books By Black British & Irish Women You Should Be Reading This Black History Month & Beyond

By NIELLAH ARBOINE via https://www.bustle.com

It’s Black history month, which means a time to celebrate, commemorate and learn more about black histories and cultures in the UK and beyond. And what better way to kick things off than with wonderful books by black British women published in 2019. These dynamic books will sit in the cannon of black British and Irish literature — adding to a legacy that should be celebrated far beyond Black History Month.

Sadly, the publishing industry still has a long way to go when it comes to diversity, who gets their foot in the door, and who gets their work published. According to the Guardian, a recent survey of 6,432 people working for 42 organisations showed that only 11.6% were BAME, which is lower than the national average population. This means it’s even more important to shout about the work by black women. And with debut books like Queenie by Londoner Candice Carty-Williams and sequels from literary royalty like Malorie Blackman receiving widespread praise this year, it’s refreshing to see the work of black women getting more recognition.

‘Daughters Of Nri’ – Reni K Amayo

From magical realism and life-hack journals to nail-biting thrillers and humorous murder mysteries – here is a list of new work by amazing black women, permeating the publishing world that you should be reading right now:

This fantasy fiction follows twins separated at birth unknowing that they have the last remnants of the old gods in them. Naala grows up in a small village whilst her …

Read More: 7 Books By Black British & Irish Women You Should Be Reading This Black History Month & Beyond

Chrysalis

I am a future butterfly at the stage of growth when I am turning into an adult. I am enclosed in a hard case shell formed by love, family, and friends. It is the hardest stage of becoming a black butterfly. You will encounter many hardships only to come out stronger and better than what you went in. At this stage, you are finding out who you truly are and how to love yourself.

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