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This college student wrote a children’s book to inspire girls to pursue STEM

Sasha

Black Women in Science

This college student wrote a children’s book to inspire girls to pursue STEM

19-year-old Sasha Ariel Alston hopes her new book will inspire young girls of color to fall in love with math and science

The tech industry has a gender diversity problem. A 19-year-old from Washington D.C. is pushing back with a new book. Sasha Ariel Alston began writing “Sasha Savvy Loves to Code,” a semi-autobiographical story about a 10 year-old African American girl and her friends attending an all-girls coding camp. Her goal was to inspire young girls to pursue science, technology, engineering, and math, while teaching some programming basics as well.

When Alston completed the book as a sophomore at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, she brought it to Kickstarter in an effort to raise $5,000 for “final production, printing, and distribution costs.” There, the book found a wildly receptive audience: “Sasha Savvy Loves to Code” reached its $5,000 goal in four days, and raised $17,602 by the end of the campaign. Alston is still talking with publishers and there is no release date just yet.

Even though the book garnered overwhelming support online, while writing, Alston kept it a secret from her friends. Alston considers herself a nerd, but the stigma surrounding coding makes her uncomfortable. “My friends knew that I was interested in coding and they would call me a nerd. They would say a lot of mean stuff,” she said. “My friends didn’t know about the book until I announced it because I didn’t want them to know or say anything about it.”

Part of the problem is a self-sustaining cycle. According to portrayals…

Please read original article – This college student wrote a children’s book to inspire girls to pursue STEM

Chrysalis

I am a future butterfly at the stage of growth when I am turning into an adult. I am enclosed in a hard case shell formed by love, family, and friends. It is the hardest stage of becoming a black butterfly. You will encounter many hardships only to come out stronger and better than what you went in. At this stage, you are finding out who you truly are and how to love yourself.

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The image of the butterfly has come to define the many expressions of the feminine black consciousness and for a good reason. The butterfly is the perfect articulation of the exquisite beauty of nature. Whether tiny or large, brightly colored or more subdued, the butterfly’s allure is undeniable. Each one displays its own unique patterns and hues, and no one species outshines any other.

Similarly, there is no one ideal image of a black woman -- each is gorgeous in her right. All African-Americans share a glorious history of struggle and perseverance that has funneled into the modern black renaissance. And, like the graceful butterfly, the awakened black woman exemplifies the dazzling beauty of that cultural evolution.

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